Archive for the ‘Monetizing Social Media’ Category

Web 2.0 Turns The Enterprise Inside Out

June 18, 2008

A couple of good examples emerged from the Churchill Club session yesterday on “Succeeding with Web 2.0 within the Enterprise”:

  • Serena Software is using Facebook as their corporate intranet and it now seems to be morphing into a sort of extranet. To overcome adoption challenges among its employee base, most of whom are ages 45 and over, Serena brought in a bunch of 16-year olds for Facebook Fridays. Serena’s SVP Marketing Rene Bonvanie claims 90% of employees are now using it. The primary benefit seems to be increased collaboration. Bonvanie says this makes it easy for both employees as well as customers to identify the right person for a specific question. Conversations have become more open and imbued with better knowledge. Thus, marketing and sales are losing some of their monopoly power as touch points with the outside world. In addition, knowing more about your previously face-less co-workers may also help increase a sense of common purpose at the workplace, states Bonvanie
  • Best Buy’s Steve Bendt shared how their internally-focused ‘Blue Shirt Nation’ network helps generate recommendations that can increase store sales. Giving this online market place of ideas the look and feel of ESPN and online games was key to creating adoption among Best Buy’s young workforce, where turnover of 60% per year is the norm
  • Paul Pedrazzi from Oracle shared how it’s internally-focused Oracle Connect and externally-focused Oracle Mix social networks do a great job of filtering content. One use case for Mix – once the traffic picks up more – is prioritizing customer needs and feature request prioritization. A common challenge is that product managers tend to overweigh feedback that is recent, local or comes from the largest customers – those who can afford to send their folks to Oracle’s executive briefing centers
  • Shiv Singh from Avenue A / Razorfish shared how their own internal wiki, now used by 75% of employees, aims to increase internal information sharing. There is no silver bullet for overcoming employees’ tendency to ‘keep information close to their chests to impress their boss’. As you would expect, measures that can drive the right behavior range from executive sponsorship to making sharing fun to incorporating collaboration in the informal and formal reward and recognition systems

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Making Advertising Work On The Other (Non-Search) Part Of The Web

June 3, 2008

MAKING DISPLAY ADS RELEVANT

Just about everyone knows advertising on the Web, outside of search, isn’t living up to expectations. Advertisers and publishers buy and sell inventory of display ads for CPMs (cost per thousand impressions) well below the offline equivalents in magazines, newspapers, and tv. Part of the reason is that outside of search, the Web hasn’t found its equivalent of the 30 second spot or the two page spread (an insight courtesy of John Batelle). But a major part of the reason is that Web sites can’t consistently serve up relevant and engaging ads to an audience that’s no longer captive. So how do we substitute relevance for the more traditional reach to increase ad prices?

For years users have left “breadcrumbs” about their interests across the Web. Now there are increasingly sophisticated ways to connect that information into rich profiles, much of it by user choice, while still respecting privacy concerns. The consolidation and massive reach of ad networks in the hands of Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft likely means that most of the economic rewards of this shift will continue to accrue to these companies. Even if the traditional media giants accelerate their migration to the Web, they are likely too late. They won’t be able to match the reach of the tech giants’ online ad networks and their trove of online personal profiles.

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